Family Campout

A little less than a week ago, this past Saturday I was at City Lake working on the orchard fence. The deer and I both appreciate a fresh apple. I knew it would be a full moon that evening. And it would be warm. And I’ve been wanting to camp with the family for forever. And I’d never camped out at City Lake before even though I’d thought of it often.

So on the drive back, I called up Lanya and asked if she was game for a family Campout at City Lake? Of course, she said yes.

After a mad scramble to collect sleeping bags and yoga mats and snacks, Joshua and Ari and I were driving back up to City Lake. Lanya was going to follow us up to the campsite after she attended to a new pet fish that had arrived a few hours earlier.

It was dark when we arrived and the moon was just coming up. Beautiful on the lake. We got a fire going and the sleeping bags in the tent when Lanya arrived. We had a good time.

Daffodils

On Facebook, a friend posted a picture of a daffodil, captioned ‘At Last.’ First thought was, “Isn’t it too early?”

Yeah probably so.

Then I thought of the bulbs I planted along the property line up at City Lake. I dug them up not far from the property line and I expect them to thrive similarly in similar soil. Picturing a line of yellow daffodils that mark the boundary in an explosion of color every Spring, but lay low mostly otherwise.

In a planting mode, I went to the high area above the ephemeral stream and next to where the ferns grow. There, in a circle around the three wild Hawthorne trees I recently discovered, I planted Hawthorne seed.

I figured that the native Hawthorne may enjoy the company. I’ll do my best to make them all feel welcome☺️. But seriously, me and Hawthorne go waaay back and I appreciate the physical and spirit medicine that Hawthorne offers. Heals the heart.

Time for repair

This MLK Day afternoon, we pulled trash out of the Ellerbe Creek tributary running by the old YWCA near downtown Durham. It took us a while to pile out of the house and I was frazzled by the time we got into the car to drive there. This was Lanya’s idea and I was mostly just going along in the name of family time and doing service today because, well, that’s our family habit.

So much plastic. So much broken glass. But I worry most about the plastic. It breaks down into components that cause all kinds of trouble for anything alive. So much plastic.

After 10 minutes, I was feeling so glad to be there in nature. Yes, the power lines were running overhead to the nearby substation. Yes, there was trash — plastic bags trailing from branches left high on the banks by the last storm– and broken glass everywhere. Yes, there was a den clawed in the bank, obscured by a few roots. Yes, there were fat worms wriggling beneath a dislodged stone. Yes, there were raccoon tracks, revealing a local’s evening activities. This was shaping up to be a magical Day of Service. Thanks, Lanya.

It came as a revelation that I wasn’t doing this cleanup to tidy. This was an act to repair some of the damage humans have inflicted on the living Earth. Or an attempt, in any case. Getting plastics out of the environment — even on a very limited scale — is an act of repair.

But why wait until the plastic deli bags wind up in Ellerbe Creek? Why not stop their migration at the source. Why not quit buying or using plastic? Well, it seems REALLY difficult because so, so many products have plastic parts or packaging.

I’m really not sure of where to start with my plastic diet. Maybe something like a food log but for plastic. How much do I really use? How much do I use that is totally optional? Hopefully I’ll keep asking myself these questions.

Meditation is a Good Start

Last March, I – like many, many other people in the beginning of the pandemic — started writing a story. I envisioned it as a thick novel. I’ve never, ever before written a novel. I’ve written a handful of thin few and far between short stories. That’s it. But I had this idea and I got my notebook. It was a composition book with the cover patterned with printed cracks. I got a pen and I started sketching out ideas.

Where I got to was a story taking place a hundred years in the future. One of the main characters, Evangeline (my wife dislikes the name), would be looking back at our pandemic time and trying to understand what it was like when the world changed. The historically important time when humanity got on the right path. And since telling the story in Evangeline’s voice, I came up with a worldview for that world that time. Getting into the head of people, a hundred years in the future.

Most people at that time thought the world is a living creature and we as people are as cells. In this Earth-being, species communities are sorts of organ systems in the Living Earth.

Now listen to this: Over time, as I was working on the story (this was March/April), I started to believe it. Really believe it. It seemed so obviously true. And I still feel that way. And what I see supports this idea: The Earth is one being and we are just a piece of it and connected to all living beings in that in that way.

Not so many months ago, I came across this New York Times piece by Ferris Jabr entitled, The Earth is Alive. The article was written in 2019 — about a year before I developed my story. Jabr’s article was almost exactly the same as the world view I sketched out in the story and have come to believe. I mean, I do have a subscription and am a frequent visitor to nytimes.com. It seems likely that I had seen the article at some point, right?

In the Jabbr article, he explores the idea that the systems of the Living Earth, such as the water cycle and the exchanges in the atmosphere, are like our own circulatory and respiratory systems. Humans, as a species, constitute an organ system for the Earth something like our nervous system and brain. We observe, we understand, we remember, we are self-aware.

We are not doing well. As both species and organ system, we are doing the opposite of our purpose of keeping the Earth-body safe. How do we fix that!? Well, meditation is a good start. Any kind will do: walking, standing, sitting, yoga, tai-chi, prayer. All can help us to become more grounded when we make decisions and to make them in line with our values.

Adapted from TaoSong 15, The Gentle Movement, TaoSong 16

It’s Too Warm for October!

Here at City Lake it is warm, warm, warm. Beautiful weather, but fills me with fear because I attribute it to climate change and a harbinger of worse to come. And that fear motivates me and has helped me to clarify one of my purposes: repair and connect with the Living Earth.

This week I came up to plant fall roots and record at City Lake with my wife and two boys. We set up the tent and read books until it got dark. So encouraging to see how comfortable my kids are in nature. Deepening that connection is SO important.

Meditative and Mindfulness practices help me to repair and connect. Trite, but true: A little bit goes a long way. By growing to pay attention to and trust our own experiences, we can stay grounded and resilient . To do The Big Work of repairing and remembering the Earth Being.

Adapted from transcript of TaoSong 13, Intro to TGM, TaoSong 14

Help Each Other, To Serve the Earth

First some appreciation for the oak tree. It gives food and fuel and habitat and cleans the air. I’ve just been gathering acorns. We’re bound to the oak tree in a million billion different ways, most of which we have no idea about. Closer to family, like kin.

For me, the Tao Te Ching isn’t a sacred text, but a pointer to an awareness of deep connection. Fundamental connections between all beings and the Earth as a whole. The Earth is alive and — apart from reproduction perhaps – has close analogs to our own bodily functions: The breathing of the atmosphere, the circulation of waters, the delicate webs of life that mirror the complexities of human physiological responses.

Suppose we are all part of the same living earth. And suppose humans are the nervous system of this earth being. We need a radical course correction because we’re acting bonkers. We need to get more grounded and more in touch with our deep purpose. Most any meditation practice is a good first step. I teach The Gentle Movement, a breath-walking meditation. Easy to do either standing or walking, in the grocery store, waiting in line, in stealth mode. It could very well be what we need to be grounded in our deep purpose: helping each other and serving the earth.

Derived from transcript of YouTube video, TaoSong 11, Intro to TGM, TaoSong 12